If you ever wondered what to pack when traveling abroad to fight alongside ISIS, one jihadi’s travel wishlist is now available to all.

Thermal clothing, solar-powered chargers and cash were among the list of items that one ISIS jihadi asked his wife to bring to Syria when she attempted to make the trip to the Caliphate.

According to photos recently released by an Australian court, 31-year-old Fatima Elomar was arrested in the Brisbane Airport in May 2014 when her luggage was seized by authorities, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Elomar was the first woman in Australia to be found guilty of supporting ISIS, after she was stopped and searched with her four children on her way to reunite with her jihadi husband in Syria.

Authorities found messages from her husband requesting things like $10,000AUD (roughly $7,360USD) in cash, hiking and camouflage boots and gear, men’s underwear and clothing, sandals for children, sock, solar watches, a men’s shaver, power adapters, solar watches and his birth certificate.

Previously, in social media posts seen by The Foreign Desk, members of ISIS often share recommended lists of items necessary to “make hijrah” the name given to the holy trip in their messages, giving recruits step-by-step directions.

These lists include items vital to ISIS militants like thermal clothing for cold climate, phones and chargers, toiletries and medication – most of which Elomar purchased on eBay, leaving an electronic trail for authorities who later matched her purchases with her online conversations with her husband, Mohamed Elomar.

Mohamed, a former boxer notorious for an image where he is holding two severed heads and another photo showing his son holding another severed head, fled Australia in 2013 to go to ISIS in Syria.

In June 2015, authorities believe Mohamed was killed by a drone strike in Raqqa, Syria.

Despite his wife’s text message history conveying that she was excited to do all that her husband had asked of her, the conversations revealed last minute doubts about making the trip to Syria with her family.

She then pleaded guilty to receiving items intended to support her husband’s jihadi lifestyle in Syria and is expected to appear again for a sentencing hearing in July, where the maximum jail sentence she faces is 10 years.

smh_3a smh_2a smh_1a