A lieutenant commander within Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corps is celebrating the 37th anniversary of the U.S. Embassy takeover in Tehran by threatening that if the United States does not keep its end of the nuclear deal, Iran will render the deal void, or “send the deal to (the) Museum,” according to Iranian media sources.

“The Iranian nation is bound to its nuclear commitments, but this commitment is not a one-way street,” Brigadier General Hossein Salami said at a commemoration of the Embassy takeover and subsequent hostage crisis in Tehran.

Salami spoke at a large-scale demonstration in Iran’s capital Thursday, further stating that if the U.S. fails to keep its word regarding the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), better known as the Iran nuclear deal, they will be forced to return to “square one” regarding negotiations.

The takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Iran occurred shortly after the beginning of the Islamic Revolution in which Iran’s monarch, Shah Reza Pahlavi, was dethroned by radical mullahs. The Embassy was raided, and 52 Americans were held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979 to January 20, 1981.

The Iran nuclear deal, or JCPOA, was an agreement reached between Tehran and the West, as represented by the nations comprising the P5+1, namely Russia, China, the U.S., Britain, France and Germany in July 2015, to “ensure that Iran’s nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful,” according to the State Department.

The agreement was adopted in October of that year and went into effect in January 2016.

Salami also warned that the Iranian government would also resume its nuclear activity and activate its discharged centrifuges.

“Iranians will fight to the last moment for their rights anywhere in the world; a complete return to conditions before JCPOA is a total possibility should the US fail to attach to its commitments in implementing much-vaunted deal,” Salami said.

Since the deal was signed, Iran has often pointed fingers at the U.S. over upholding its side of the deal, while at the same time Iran’s government has come under serious criticism regarding its financial and material support of global terror, human rights abuses, imprisonment of American, Canadian and European individuals and its ongoing involvement in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen.

Meanwhile, Germany’s domestic intelligence agency reported that the Iranian regime has plans to follow a “clandestine” road to obtaining nuclear technology and paraphernalia from German companies in what the report called “a quantitatively high level,” even by international standards.

The Associated Press discovered a secret agreement revealing that the nuclear deal would undoubtedly lift limits on Iran’s weapons program long before the deal expires in 10 years. During this time they could install thousands of centrifuges, five times more than what the regime currently has, in addition to enriching uranium faster than its current capability.

It was later discovered that coinciding with the start of the deal in January, the U.S. airlifted $400 million in foreign currencies to Iran, and on the same day, four Americans being held in Iranian prisons were released. The State Department still denies that the money was paid as ransom for the hostages.

Since, an Iranian American father and son, Siamak and Bagher Namazi, have recently been sentenced to 10 years in prison in Iran for allegedly “cooperating with the U.S. government against Iran.”

Reza (Robin) Shahini, an American Iranian dual citizen has also been taken into custody during this time. Shahini traveled from San Diego to Iran to reportedly visit his ill mother when he was arrested. Last week The Foreign Desk reported that Shahini was sentenced to 18 years for his activities on Facebook and for cooperating with a foreign government, referring to the U.S.