The Hezbollah terror group has launched an online ‘crowdfunding’ drive inviting supporters to contribute toward the group’s purchasing of military equipment and gear for its militants.

The Lebanese-based terror group has created a series banners featuring helmets, bullet-proof vests, guns and ammunition with telephone numbers prominently displayed advising how to contribute.

“Mujahids on glorious battlefronts are in need of clothing and military equipment,” a statement on the website reads.

An accompanying video shows a Hezbollah fighter adjusting his military fatigues, preparing for conflict.

There is also a custom hashtag “equip a mujhaid,” that the group has been circulating to increase viral activity of the campaign on social media networks such as Facebook and Twitter.

‘Financial jihad’ is nothing new, according to a website promoting the money-raising campaign; Rather, constant rejuvenation and reminders are needed so that those who can afford to contribute can fulfill their requirement to perform Jihad as prescribed by the Koran.

The website features a set of telephone numbers spread across regions in Lebanon and also provides a number for “international relations” as well as a special “women’s division.”

Hezbollah’s primary source of funding comes from Iran’s government and is estimated by the U.S. to be at around $100 million per year, though some analysts believe the figure could be as high as $200 million annually.

Iran’s regime also profits extensively from drug cartels across South America, funneling those funds to Hezbollah and the financing of other terror activities.

Critics in the Arab world have ridiculed the campaign as a sign of a weakness on Hezbollah’s part, questioning whether the terror group is ‘running a little low on resources.’

“Iran’s finances are running scarce due to its immersion in regional and international conflict,” one Lebanese anti-Hezbollah newspaper said, a reference to Iran’s involvements in conflicts across the Middle East.

Iranian involvement in the Syria conflict has been widely documented, with reports that as many as 70,000 troops have been deployed to the war-ravaged country.

At least 1000 Iranian soldiers have died in the conflict.

Iran has also been accused of running an ‘arms pipeline’ to Yemen’s Houthi rebels fighting a bloody civil war against a Saudi-backed campaign supporting the internationally recognized government of President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi.

Meanwhile, Hezbollah remains a continued threat to Israel. Described by the country’s defense establishment as the number one threat to Israel, the once guerilla-like army has been emboldened by the experiences of fighting a ‘real war’ in Syria and smuggling ‘game changing weaponry’ into Lebanon.